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  1. #1
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    Default PTSD rates are said to be much higher in PCASP than in [UK] military personnel.

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    "Rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are much higher in private security contractors than in UK military personnel according to a new report which also identified that private security workers are offered little psychological support."

    Probably from all the stand by, fast balls, pay drops, hoop jumping and courses and the fact the job sucks.

    I would assume training providers could be held somewhat accountable for creating so much pressure to comply with fictitious requirements placed on UK contractors

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    Haha... Good comment mate.
    Hope my reply gets you out of the negative figures BTW as you should be in positives anyway

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    Quote Originally Posted by Falklan View Post
    Shiptalk, News, Marine, Maritime, Shipping, Shipping Industry, Courses, Conferences, Seminars for Seafarers at Sea

    "Rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are much higher in private security contractors than in UK military personnel according to a new report which also identified that private security workers are offered little psychological support."

    Probably from all the stand by, fast balls, pay drops, hoop jumping and courses and the fact the job sucks.

    I would assume training providers could be held somewhat accountable for creating so much pressure to comply with fictitious requirements placed on UK contractors
    PTSD isn't really caused by problems with pay and such like, that's a very different form of stress. But it is important to point out that all sources of stress add up. Having a bereveament or a loved one that is sick affects us very differently than worrying about money. The stress of periods with no work then fastballs are another sort of stress. But all of these have a cumulative affect on the body to cope with anything else, so the more stress you have generally, the more chance you have of getting PTSD when something traumatic happens.

    There is a misconception that those who suffer from mental issues are soft, it is the case that some people get overly bothered about little things, however when it come to real life affecting problems it is natural to get stressed. Stress is part of our fight or flight system. Useful in the primitive world when the danger just happened and you fought or ran, not so useful in the modern world where your family might be made homeless by a company not paying you and fighting the owner isn't going to improve the situation.

    When we get stressed our body reacts to run or fight. Adrenaline and cortizone flood the system which have undesirable affects when not actually used. Glucose is released from the liver (we then crave for more ie. comfort eating) . Systems we don't need for running or fighting shut down to focus resources on more vital areas. So our immune system shuts down, leaving us prone to infection, digestion shuts down causing ulcers, appetite problems etc. and blood is diverted from the thinking part of the brain to the more primitive reactive part of the brain. In long term low level stress these systems don't shut down totally but only partially.

    There are other factors that will affect private operators more than the military. Smaller teams with higher staff turnover hence less continuity which means geting used to new people and not being too sure how they will perform if there is an attack. Occassional poor team members and the hassle of trying to get the company to replace them. Less back up if there is an attack. Knowing that if you get kidnapped no-one is going to come and rescue you. Knowing that if you end up in a foreign prison even for something minor like a visa issue, the government is not exactly going to be pulling the stops out to get you out.


    Now a question. In the military there would presumably be regular exercise sessions if the job itself isn't always active, does this happen with private contractors? Exercise is very good for stress in that it burns off adrenaline, improves circulation in the lymph system, helps digestion etc.

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    Well it can't be from anything traumatic.. this is maritime security we're talking about,..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Falklan View Post
    Well it can't be from anything traumatic.. this is maritime security we're talking about,..
    There is a certain amount of stress associated with nothing happening. In fact the higher the degree of nothingness compared to the seriousness of the something you're anticipating, the greater the amount of stress.

    If you're expecting something serious and very life threatening to happen and you're not going to get any gradual build up, your body will be producing the fight or flight reaction but you're doing nothing to burn up the adrenaline and use up the glucose. So there is a gradual increaese in stress. Some people have the ability to relax whilst still being alert then jump in to action when required, some don't.

    Whilst that in itself won't cause PTSD it will reduce chances of recovering from previous traumatic incidents and the stress levels may awaken an old problem.

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    Little woman- are you quoting from a counselling PTSD text-book?
    What you're posting could apply to 100% of the world's population and is applicable to ex-regular soldiers as much as being applicable to any civvy who may even get secondary or tertiary symptoms of PTSD from talking to someone who has experienced trauma or who has spoken to somebody who knows somebody who has experienced trauma.
    These are all legitimate cases in the counselling world.
    The article does come from shiptalk so is concerning security guys who work on boats.
    A high % are experienced in other theatres and, myself included, look upon the boats as a nice little holiday as the only threat is (maybe) bunch of black blokes on a few skiffs (maybe).
    There are no ambushes, VBIEDs, IEDs, IDF, kidnap threats to contend with out on the water, you just have to remember to pack your 1TB hard-drive to save yourself from dying of monotony and boredom.

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    Interesting subject,
    It is unheard of for security companies to offer any counselling or psychological services, I think if anyone is seen to have any issues, the company will not want them around weapons or Principals and rightly so.
    However I do think that there are a lot of operators that could benefit from having a cup of tea or informal chat with counsellors once per year or so. At the very least if a security company has a large number of employees, the service should be offered and it is up to the individual to make the choice to use it or not.

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    I know of a few blokes who could really do with some good counselling and I'm surprised that it hasn't been made mandatory in this game yet.
    This is the way that the game should go especially as contractors are being used more and more to cut down on many governmental budgets and it's only going to get worse in the future
    It's very surprising that it hasn't been introduced yet considering all the shit that many of us have been through but maybe the PTB don't want to publically recognise that there is a big problem incoming in the private game?
    Considering that bloke from G4S in Baggers a few yrs ago : I thought proper counselling from good counsellors would have been very relevant.
    We all have demons and sleepless nights but as the yrs pass it's a lot more manageable.

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    Gareth,
    I agree I think it should be mandatory, there is a great project in Australia that helps ex military with mental health issues:
    Our Philosophy | Trojan's Trek

    It would be nice to see something like this in UK.

    I think the hardest part is to get guys to see a counsellor, as many see it as a negative and if their peers find out they could either use it as an opportunity to stitch someone up or take the p1ss.
    They have counsellors in the police and fire service so why not in Private Security.
    I started studying Psychology and its interesting as I'm around a lot of people in the CP industry, and once they know I'm studying psychology it either goes two ways:
    People stop talking to me OR over a cup of tea they recount their stories from hostile environments, which I love to listen to and I try and ask questions from a security point of view and to get to the bottom of what their thoughts are, and let them talk it out.

    Interesting thread

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    We were offered counselling after an Ireland tour many moons ago but nobody took it up.
    I think with age you realise that's it not a bad thing to do but you have to watch out that you're not marked-down for doing it.
    Making it mandatory would make it a lot easier to handle and prevent company come-backs.
    This would definitely help the young guys who don't yet realise that they need it.
    It has to be from bloody good counsellors though and not someone who's picked up their degree 5 mins ago.

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