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Become a Tier 2 Medic

Horizon Security Ltd

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#1
Horizon are now offering the opportunity for individuals to become a Tier 2 medic.

As we all know the security industry is forever changing with higher levels of training and certification being asked, due to this there is a never ending struggle for private security officers to secure work “ unless you are a Tier 2 Medic†as we all know.

Horizon are the first training centre in the UK to get individuals to the Tier 2 level from scratch by completing the IHCD Tech course then the Offshore medical course.

This can be achieved by firstly completing the IHCD technician course at Horizons training centre run by FTS Solutions over a 7 week period, then completing 750 clinical hours which FTS can help achieve whilst being paid by the private ambulance service as an emergency driver (after completing the driving course) or EMT, Clinical hours would not be conducted in Scotland, the main area would be NE England and within the M25 belt.

You would then come back to Horizon and complete the Offshore medical course over a 2 week period with a further 5 days clinical again which Horizon and FTS can help achieve.

The average salary for a Tier 2 at this present day ranges from £350 - £475 per day in hostile environments, not only does becoming a Tier 2 medic massively increase your chances of employment but it also opens up more doors in the private sector, oil and gas sector, offshore sector and UK land based medical sector.

There is accommodation available at the training centre for as little as £20pn sharing and £30pn single occupancy.

All dates for these courses can be seen on our website Horizon Security Solutions - Home or Ambulance Training UK - FTS Solutions - Home

For further information on both courses please contact info@horizon.uk.com or jleitch@ftssolutions.com +44 (0)1324 620720, +44 (0)7803 887510
 

Starlight

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#2
Given your proposed pathway option, the applicant still wouldn't meet the basic requirements to become an offshore medic. To become an offshore medic, you have to be either a CMT1 or other service equivalent, a Paramedic or a Nurse with pre-hospital experience........

Without the pre-requisite qualifications, a stand alone IHCD tech isn't eligible to become an OSM
 

stewmac91

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#4
Here we go again, absolutely no concern for the standards and experience of the 'medics' that will be introducing to the industry. A newly qualified IHCD technician, with or without an OSM course, has no place in the hostile or offshore environment.
 

Horizon Security Ltd

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#6
Here we go again, absolutely no concern for the standards and experience of the 'medics' that will be introducing to the industry. A newly qualified IHCD technician, with or without an OSM course, has no place in the hostile or offshore environment.
Hi Stewart

The IHCD course is 7 weeks long (classroom based) the candidate then has to get 750 hours clinical time (hands on experience) signed off by a Paramedic, before he can even attend the offshore course, once the offshore course has been completed he has further clinical hours and experience to gain before becoming an offshore medic.

The whole process will take 6-18 months, we also run PHTLS, TCCC and a few other short courses during the IHCD course, at the minute some companies are putting on EMTs 1 week courses with no experience as there are a shortage of Tier 2s, what would you rather have.
 

stewmac91

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#7
When you ask me what I'd rather have, I'm assuming you're asking me who I would rather have looking after me ? Well, the person I would rather have looking after me would be a professional medic, preferably with professional registration, several years of clinical experience, some of which were gained in a hostile/austere environment. That would be a starting point I suppose.

I'm well aware of the content of both the ambulance technician and the offshore medic course, the former being extremely limited in the scope of practice it offers on qualification, and the latter designed to offer already qualified medics an insight into working offshore . I suppose I'm struggling to understand how a course, originally implemented to meet HSE guidelines for medics working offshore in the North Sea, coupled with the ambulance technican qualifications produces a medic competent enough to work remotely and independently. The ambulance technician course offers little in the way of invasive or extended skills and the schedule of medication is also extremely limited.

I agree that the ambulance technician qualification offers a solid starting point for anyone who would want to pursue a career as a professional medic, but personally, I'd be very concerned if that was the limit of expertise of the designated medic working in the middle of the sand.

As for companies employing people as 'professional medics' after a one week EMT course, well, I suppose you could call that wilful negligence.
 

Arnaud

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#8
I knew this day would arrive sooner or later.... After all, what the HSE really says about eligibility is pretty loose, isn't it ?

Yeah, go ahead, cut the corners and see what happens. When the audit team comes and starts asking questions. IV lines, IV fluids, suture kit, advanced airways, ACLS drugs... that's not so much to cover in a 10 days course LOL

Next year we will all be tier 2 medics, that's when the wages will be 250 a day for a tier 2 medic and the guys start looking for remote medic jobs in Africa or offshore medic jobs.... but on that type of scene, with a IHCD Tech background and three rotations in Iraq... good luck to find employment. Just saying.

The guys currently working on these jobs will probably be reluctant to forward CVs to their management when they see the training provider is devaluating their qualification.
 

Horizon Security Ltd

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#9
Hi guys

I don't know why people keep coming back saying its a 10 day course, IHCD tech is a 7 week course followed by 750 clinical hours as a prerequisite before attending the OSMC so that's a good 4-12 months depending on the guys rotations.

After the completing the IHCD course and clinical hours only then can they attend the OSMC which is 14 days and further clinical hours.

People think having an operator with 10 years experience trained up to be a medic is a good idea, people think having a paramedic with 10 years experience that left the military 15 years ago is better, no matter what any training provider does someone will have a winge, at the minute guys aren't happy with Eastern Europeans being the tier 2 medic as there's not enough Brits, there not happy that there brit tier 2 medic has no operational experience, IV worked with Tier 2 medics that left the forces 12-15 years ago and work in the ambulance service in the north of Scotland that brag how easiy there job is, barely ever get called out, and then they get flung into Iraq to deal with stuff they have never seen.

At the moment companies are struggling that much they are taking on tier 2 medics with no military or operational experience as long as they do a 2 week CP course, don't see the tier 2 medics complaining about that, if there was a happy medium or a structured course we would ran that as there is a clear need for it, however no matter what there will always be a complaint, a gripe and winge it's the all industry's are the same, the securoty industry a little worse.

Also it's not devaluing a qualification, if the persons not done the course it can't be devalued, if they completed the ihcd course then the offshore course then they have furthered there education by completed 2 extra quals, it would only be devalued if we were teaching crap courses, which we don't and wouldn't stoop to that level.

If we didn't advertise it as a tier 2 course people can still do the OSMC with a CMT or ihcd background and have been about to do so for the past couple of years, all we are doing is running both in the same location.
 

Horizon Security Ltd

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#10
Here we go again, absolutely no concern for the standards and experience of the 'medics' that will be introducing to the industry. A newly qualified IHCD technician, with or without an OSM course, has no place in the hostile or offshore environment.
I see your point, but you think a paramedic with no hostile experience does, this is just a question as companies are taking on tier 2's with no prior military or oparational experience as long as they complete a 2 week course.

Here the shoe is on the other foot, do you think it's right someone that's completed there 2nd year to become a paramedic with no hostile experience and completed a 2 week CP course be allowed to work along side operators who has to have a 5 year military background and 2 year operational at a minimum.

But the operator with the 5 years military and 2 years operational experience shouldn't be allowed to complete a (give or take) 1 year course (including clinical placements) to become a medic.
 

sweed

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#11
To summarize where this thread have gone:

Horizon have found a potential market to sell a course (I’m not a medic and can’t say if it as a good or bad one) off-course he want to make money, that is what business is about.

The Medics on the forum don’t like it because it make them loose value as they will be less rare, and they will see their salaries drop. Off-course they want to be “privileged†and protect their interest, it’s their living.

Industry Standards is the argument from Medics, and Horizon defends with – Companies takes in Paramedics without security/Military background, which one is less bad: An experienced security operator who is quick-and-dirty trained medic or a true medic without security experience?

I can’t answer that question, but I guess it is about priority, is the tier 2 medic primary a medic and secondly a security team member or the other way around?

What I do have an opinion about is how availability to a quick-and-dirty-road to tier 2 medic qualification will affect the industry salaries in the long run, I’m pretty sure it will drop them!
First in the medic field as when it becomes a higher supply than demand, and then all others will follow, as sh*t rolls downhill.
 
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sweed

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#12
I see your point, but you think a paramedic with no hostile experience does, this is just a question as companies are taking on tier 2's with no prior military or oparational experience as long as they complete a 2 week course.

Here the shoe is on the other foot, do you think it's right someone that's completed there 2nd year to become a paramedic with no hostile experience and completed a 2 week CP course be allowed to work along side operators who has to have a 5 year military background and 2 year operational at a minimum.

But the operator with the 5 years military and 2 years operational experience shouldn't be allowed to complete a (give or take) 1 year course (including clinical placements) to become a medic.
Horizon: Will you be vetting the guys who want to follow this tier 2 program, whether they have enough military & industry experience, or will it be open to any Johnny Airsoft wannabe to do it so you can have tier 2 medics without any military/industry experience coming in on a PSD as tier 2 medic?
If yes, where will you putt the minimum level?
 

Starlight

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#13
Hello Starlight

IHCD tech with the 750 clinical hours is the prerequisite for any HSE offshore medical course, feel free to email any other provider and/or ask HSE themselves Advice@hse.gsi.gov.uk

Many thanks
Yep, done that, and according to another provider and the market leader in this matter, the para,nurse,cmt1 thingy still applies.

And a tech does not have the autonomy to act in the same way that the above does. A tech is a specific to the NHS, and as a trade, and unless in support of a paramedic, (that would be nice wouldn't it) has no place in the sand/rig/vessel.

And what about the med interview? The one where the applicant is asked a few technical questions by (usually) an in-house paramedic or similar. One of those questions will be about core qualifications and registration to support the OSM ticket. That'll be interesting.
 
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Arnaud

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#14
Hi guys

I don't know why people keep coming back saying its a 10 day course, IHCD tech is a 7 week course followed by 750 clinical hours as a prerequisite before attending the OSMC so that's a good 4-12 months depending on the guys rotations.
I am surprised by such an answer.

7 weeks, yes of course, learning the BASICS such as the BASIC anat/physio, the immobilizations, the BLS for cardiac arrest ("B" for BASIC once again), the ways to stop a bleeding, to transport a patient, etc etc....

The pieces of kit I mentioned are ADVANCED equipment, and will need to be learnt during the two weeks Offshore Medic Course (both week ends included apparently... I'll check the dates when they appear on your website). These are NOT things used by Amb Technicians unless you break the law. Something called scope of practice.

YES, you are devaluating the qual, soon enough you will have trained entire battalions of "Offshore Medics" and next time I will say I am an Offshore Medic, people will answer : "ha, an ambulance technician with 750 hours of practice ?". Well NO, I had done three years as a military medic, including situations where I was the only medical personnel in remote jungle and desert environments, doing trauma but also various types of tropical diseases and primary healthcare, plus two years as a remote site medic in three different African countries. As I said before, I already know such people who have taken shortcuts to become Offshore Medics and I was a bit hurt when I heard an ops manager saying because of them : "I mean, a real tier 2 medic, a proper paramedic, not an Offshore Medic".

As for tier 2 medics without military or police experience, I know there were some of them in the beginning around 2011, but these days have long gone. If the guys were so difficult to find, the salaries would be around 700 USD/day, not 450.

I can't blame you for using a market niche especially if you respect laws and regulations, however, as usual, the result in terms of quality of service will be disastrous.

....and I'm not even imagining a case of SHTF.

I am not wingeing, as I already have my plans B and C ready.
 

remote medic

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#15
I am really chuffed to bits knowing that my 2 years military medic training, along with the 4 years to get promoted has counted for so much nowadays ...... with people being able to "fast track a qualification .......

The majority of Employers (there are only a FEW exceptions!!) aren't bothered about the calibre or quality of medics they employ - rather than how cheaply they can employ for ...bums on seats and take the money !!! - in the 20 years in civvy street as a remote / cp / offshore medic - I have only been formally medically assessed by an employer maybe 3 times ...... (not bad for maybe 15 jobs)

As for flooding the market - in years gone by - there were only 3 or 4 recognised offshore medic training providers for the HSE Offshore Medic Qualification - Hull, Great Yarmouth and a couple in Aberdeen - now every tom dick and harry is flogging the course .... with far fewer jobs and more people in the market to choose from ... all TO MAKE MONEY

The security industry is obviously chuffed to bits that there is a readily available gullible source of new recruits to supply the fickle nature of the industry (which is far worse than the offshore one) .... its only when you get on the job that you realise there is often no defib .... maybe an aed if your lucky and medicines ... what medicines and no resupply? top cover ? indemnity insurance?... to name only a few of the issues that arise from employing personnel with a limited medical background....

Having recently been interviewed by several of the big offshore medic agencies - one of the assessors commented on how poor the standard of offshore medic was within their own particular company that were employing medics offshore ...

Regardless of the training/ qualifications these training companies provide - professionalism and self pride means that the majority of conscientious medics still undertake PHEC's and ALS courses, along with additional courses as part of there skill upkeep

I wish any training company all the best for the future .... but to the candidates embarking on a career ....to try and fast track becoming a tier 2 (or whatever screwed up title the industry calls them) ...Think long and hard before spending your cash ...as there is no job (regardless of all the promises) until a contract gets signed and the moneys in the bank...

Just my thoughts for what they are worth....

Oh and hi to all and a Happy New Year for 2015!!

BZ
 
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Horizon Security Ltd

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#17
Hello Guys

Sorry I am just seeing these posts now, The IHCD tech course has a conversation course for CMT 1 letting a CMT 1 attend the IHCD course missing out some elements but still having to conduct the 750 clinical hours, im unsure why there would be such a conversion course if a CMT 1 is deemed a higher grade and can go straight onto the OSMC, I can only imagine that a CMT 1 needs to do a civilianised course to be recognised outwith a PMSC environment, if someone can explain please do.

However unsure if anyone has heard, Ed Excel have recently pulled the plug on the IHCD tech course and apparently the paramedic course through Ed Excel meaning all studies to that level will be carried out in university.

So to that end we will not be running the IHCD tech course and able students to comeback and carry out the OSMC after completion of there 750 clinical hours and extended skills.

The minimum requirement on the HSE web site is CMT 1 or equivalent, just out of curiosity who knows what the civilian equivalent to a CMT 1 is, also what is the duration of the CMT 1 course.

Bravoone, yes we do recruit Tier 2 medics and have done for the past 2 years.

All we are trying to do is offer a gap in the market for individuals to conduct a OSMC, we are not looking for short cuts, to be perfectly honest on a company & business point of view the longer the training takes the better the profit, we have no intention of fast tracking people on any course, why would we if the money is in the longevity of the student conducting the course, why on earth would we run a short course for less money when we could run the longer variant and charge more.

This is just an example, our courses are very reasonably priced (honestly), we offer cheap accommodation on site for the students, not here to rip anyone off or cut corners as our previous students know.

On that note: we are running CPD courses that include, PHTLS, TCCC, MIMMS, DAC, and soon to be ACLS.

please visit Horizon Security Solutions - Home

Cheers & stay safe

Horizon
 

Jonny1979

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#18
I see your point all round I’m an IHCD ambulance technician with 7 years full time 999 clinical experience with a clinical portfolio as evidence and have a lot of clinical experience with trauma illness’s and diseases I don’t see what the issue is with technicians completing the course if they have long term front line experience but training them with there 750 hours then there of shore medic course then sending them straight out is a little crazy it takes at least 2 years I’d say working 999 front line in a clinical setting full time before you can really be a confident clinician but thats from my experience and Now I’ve worked the rapid response car for the past 5 years as it took me 2 years to really find my feet and I was a nurse for 11 years before hand but pre hospital care is a totally different kettle of fish being the only medic on scene for long period of time it’s only now I’m confident and very experienced that I’m thinking of sitting the offshore course but I wish anyone good luck who try’s to do this I think they would kill someone very quick sorry to put it bluntly but with little experience I don’t think it’s a good idea and it’s someone loved ones life in there hands and I wouldn’t want them treating me
 
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