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beef jerky

Pyrene

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#1
so ive recently got into beef jerky as i found out how much protein is in it. and looking around its not cheap so it was suggested to make my own.

if anyone does make their own, what cut of beef are you using?

cheer s

P
 

littlewoman

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#4
Fortunately, the wonderful Martin attends festivals and shows people how to make their own, I have been to such an event and can pass on the knowledge. Although it should be noted that it doesn't contain any more protein than before its dried, its just that you cut off the fat and obviously remove all the water. Buts its good for preserving meat for rations when travelling, hiking or working at festivals. I also use it so I can buy meat cheap when its on offer and not have to find room in the freezer for it.

You can only do this with dark meat, not pork, poultry etc. Any cut will do but it need to be relatively fat free, fat in chuncks you can cut off is fine.
Cut of every bit of fat
Slice meat really thin
Rub in salt and seasoning, this is only for flavouring, you only need a small amount of salt, similar to what you'd put on a meal. I use Cayenne as seasoning.
Lay on a metal grid, I use cooling trays.
Put in the oven with the oven on as low as possible and leave a slight gap in the door, just for the moisture to get out.
Takes around 4 hours but may be more. You have to make sure its totally dry because its the lack of moisture that stops it going off.
Seal in plastic food bags with as much of the air squeezed out as possible

Incidentally the traditional way of drying is over charcoal but I'm guessing you don't have anywhere you can build a charcoal fire. I believe Martin does all his over charcoal so it gets a better taste. The French for charcoal is what gives it the term "jerky" the same applies to Jamaican "Jerk" chicken, which is a very different product.

If anyone's going on any expeditions etc. Martins dried meats are very useful for that, they also do dried sheets of fruit puree and dried sausages.
 

Walks99

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#5
I came across this guy at the Aber food festival this year and was quite suprised about what they actually do - albeit an expensive taste in dried meat/fruit and other foods stuff!

I found the best one was the dried goat jerky....interesting flavour with the caribiean falvours but if you like the taste of mutton - its sometimes a cheeper alternative to beef.

I order in a few packs for a change every now and again but the local South African Butchers down the road has a very good counter of Jerky and Biltong.

Cheers

Walks
 

Hilly140

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#6
Another alternative but also pricey option is South African Biltong meat.
Very tasty and also high in protein.
Hilly
 

Trojanhorse

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#7
I would agree with you on price and urge you NOT to buy from Martin as it is addictive! Marmite jerky.........
 

Pyrene

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#8
so to sum up really, any bit of beef is good? :) as little fat as possible though
 

Millie5

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#9
I didn't hear about South African Biltong meat, where it is available.
Any thing about this particular meat, Do you guys have taste it.
 

Pyrene

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#10
I didn't hear about South African Biltong meat, where it is available.
Any thing about this particular meat, Do you guys have taste it.
hello rookie.

yeah ive had it. buy it from tesco usually - look at the displays hanging in the isles
biltong doesnt taste as good, and is chewier and smaller bits, often flakes. still good and tasty (well i think so, my boss thinks its arse!)
 

Nomad

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#11
hello rookie.

yeah ive had it. buy it from tesco usually - look at the displays hanging in the isles
biltong doesnt taste as good, and is chewier and smaller bits, often flakes. still good and tasty (well i think so, my boss thinks its arse!)
No wonder you think biltong is worse if you are getting it from the supermarket. Get it from boutique sellers and independent butcher and Safa shops. A few good ones around Wimbledon and a very good one in Kingston. The venison biltong is very tasty and melts in the mouth, not nearly as chewy as jerky unless you like that chewy thing :)
 

Pyrene

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#12
No wonder you think biltong is worse if you are getting it from the supermarket. Get it from boutique sellers and independent butcher and Safa shops. A few good ones around Wimbledon and a very good one in Kingston. The venison biltong is very tasty and melts in the mouth, not nearly as chewy as jerky unless you like that chewy thing :)
can you pm me some shops at all?? cheers P
 

Pyrene

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#16
tried something new other night before work...chicken jerky...wow, nom nom nom
 

littlewoman

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#17
tried something new other night before work...chicken jerky...wow, nom nom nom
Do you mean dried chicken as opposed to Jamaican Jerk chicken? I was told you couldn't dry chicken (or to be precise that dried chicken would stay edible for long)
 

Stretchgunner

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#19
Biltong is a kind of cured meat that originated in South Africa. Many different types of meat are used to produce it, ranging from beef through game meats to fillets of ostrich from commercial farms. It is typically made from raw fillets of meat cut into strips following the grain of the muscle, or flat pieces sliced across the grain. It is similar to beef jerky in that they are both spiced, dried meats, but differ in their typical ingredients, taste and production processes; in particular the main difference from jerky is that biltong is usually thicker (from cuts up to 1" (25 mm) thick), while jerky is rarely more than 1/8" (3 mm) thick and biltong does not have a sweet taste
 
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