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Gemini

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Jul 21, 2010
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#1
Key - can be lost or locked in the building (if a nightlatch is used)
Code - the code entry can be observed by a potential person aiming for un-authorised access
Biometric - an electrical fault or mal function on the control panel can occur [regardless of a backup power supply]


If an electrical lock fails, then an overide key is required to gain access, so why not use a key in the first place?

I was thinking from a guests point of view, when no staff or management or on site to let the person in who is locked out, although occurances may be rare.
 

premier

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#2
gemini,

it would depend on how far you wanted to go down the technology route and the size of the budget.

for arguments sake you could have a proximitty reader which controled a class change relay that powered a fail secure door which inturn had a remote bypass should there be a power fail situation.
or
you could simply have a good old fashioned key, and if key loss is a problem attach it to a chain which is then attached to a five gallon drum.

two very different points of view and a opposite ends of the budget scale :rolleyes:
 

Gemini

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#3
How reliable would you say that the technlology is, based on a system that involved a "reader" (of any type), a seperate controller, mains powered and with a battery backup?

Is the controller likely to mal function, or is the chance generally quite small, do you think?
 

premier

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#4
if you fit quality kit and not the cheapest of crap you will be fine.

pm inbound ;)
 

Gemini

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#5
if you fit quality kit and not the cheapest --- you will be fine
Just to make it clear, I do not have an install taking place at this present time. The thread was just a matter of interest. Feel free to post suggestions below.

Lets base the replies on a "money no object" scenario to open answers a little more.
 

Visioneer

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#7
...just an observation....but:

Code access ? Surprising how often the 'tradesmans' code, post, milkie, etc is : 1234 or 0000.

Master key: Normally Fire Service etc have their own, but it's not unusual for 'caretaker', Buiding Manager, etc, to tuck one away 'somewhere safe' ! :)
 

aes69

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#8
The TraCcess system isn't used by the client company employees. The access keys are held by vetted security operators and the code sent to them via a central ops room. Each SO has their own indivual key which is downloaded at the end of each shift and shows on the management software of times opened, closed, location etc.

It gives both the security company and the client a clear audit trail to operations.
 
D

Deleted member 33

Guest
#9
This is my front door lock:

Biometric Door Lock

Very reliable - no problems.

The thing that strikes me with your initial post is the fact that with any security solution there is always an angle to belittle it. For the most part, security systems of any calibre will simply not sustain market forces from the customer base if it is useless. If it works, is reliable, is used by main players and suits your purpose you can't really go wrong.



Rich H
 
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D

Deleted member 33

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#11
The lock is the only biometric lock that can be fitted to ANY door and so dependent on the existing door will determine the exact cost. Mine was £600.


Rich H
 

Visioneer

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#12
Actually, thats reasonable.

If only joe public spent a fraction of what they spent on the stuff in their home, securing it, life would be a bloody sight easier !
 

db1

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#13
On a side note, day job, we do works for a large client where we are sometimes unable to work during normal hours. When we work out of hours we have to have guarding.

A lot of the buildings have swipe cards (don't know what system I'm afraid).

One night the engineers had to move from one room to another, the guard going with them. The full acess key card the guard had failed to work, leaving the guard and the engineers trapped in a room.
Solution ......... they took out the ceiling tiles, climbed through the ceiling space into the other room and open the door.

Kind of bypassed all the security systems :)
 
D

Deleted member 33

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#14
On a side note, day job, we do works for a large client where we are sometimes unable to work during normal hours. When we work out of hours we have to have guarding.

A lot of the buildings have swipe cards (don't know what system I'm afraid).

One night the engineers had to move from one room to another, the guard going with them. The full acess key card the guard had failed to work, leaving the guard and the engineers trapped in a room.
Solution ......... they took out the ceiling tiles, climbed through the ceiling space into the other room and open the door.

Kind of bypassed all the security systems :)
But that was internal - you already had access to the main building itself. This would only become an issue if specific areas or rooms of that building were zoned with differing levels of sy for different areas or rooms.



Rich H
 

db1

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#15
Yes it was internal.

The buildings are very high security.

It just amazed / amazes me that apparently secure areas, specifically those that only certain card / key holders have access to, can be accesed through something as simple as removing the ceiling tiles.
 
D

Deleted member 33

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#16
Yes it was internal.

The buildings are very high security.

It just amazed / amazes me that apparently secure areas, specifically those that only certain card / key holders have access to, can be accesed through something as simple as removing the ceiling tiles.

Although it may be amazing you must realise that (good) sy is defence in depth. As a result, sy manpower patrols, CCTV, sensors etc will also be used. To that end, the prospect of an individual to 'hide' within a 'permitted area' and wait till the silent hours in order to move to a 'non-permitted' area via the ceiling space is simply highly unlikely but would more than likely be discovered regardless.



Rich H
 

bluelight

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Dec 18, 2010
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#17
The place where i work most of the doors on site are digilocks, but on the new build on the site they use a swipe access card, if the swipe system is used correctly you can set each swipe card to let staff into areas where they need to go. but like some of the posts above its best to get the top of the range locks/swipe system as it will last you in the long run...


bluelight.
 

medicgirl

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#20
As with any system problems and breaches are usually down to human error - we are the weakest link. I was asked by an organisation to "test" just where the weakest links in their security may be...next morning I was sitting in the managers seat at his desk to prove the point! People will often let the person behind them through the door when they swipe their card etc. Sometimes you can have the best gadgets going but if the staff arn't security aware it is next to useless :)
 
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