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CViT questions for this new guy

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May 10, 2015
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#1
Hello all!

I am Portuguese, I am 23 years old and I am in the uk for about 4 months. I am currenctly working on a full time job that i dont love but it pay my bills.

I was thinking about my career when I found SIA information and as I keep looking more interested I become.

But I have some questions such as:

- We do and pay the trainning for cvit, and then what? what kind of things i need more?

- Do i need a Driver Qualification Card (DQC)?

- Can I find jobs straight away?

- There is any complementary trainning?

Thanks guys
 

TonyRes

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#2
Hey mate

There are really only 3 companies doing CVIT these days, the Post Office (not sure if they are taking anyone on anymore), G4S and Securitas.

You should get in touch with all of them and find out if they have vacancies and if they do the training, I think they will take you on and then train you up and apply for your badge, doubt that you will need the DQC as most of them use transit size vans these days.

This job below sounds like it may be G4S thru an agency, you could get in touch with them and find out all the info you need.

https://www.cv-library.co.uk/cgi-bi...nnum&posted=3&tempperm=Any&industry=&order=sm

It depends on where you live who you want to go to work with, G4S are in Park Royal.
Secure Driver - Park Royal (Future Opportunites) - Park Royal - United Kingdom

Securitas are in Dagenham.
Vacancies

Post Office are in West Ham.
Cash Collection Services | Post Office

The job aint easy and there is some risk to doing it, G4S are constantly advertising which isn't a good sign...

Good luck
 

SGTGerman

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#4
The job aint easy and there is some risk to doing it, G4S are constantly advertising which isn't a good sign...

[/QUOTE]

I hope I don't come of as ignorant Tony but, could you further explain why the job is difficult? I realise you'll be protecting valuable and sensitive materials which will obviously make you a target. Is it the weight of responsibility? Is there a massive amount of pressure reaching destinations on time?
 

TonyRes

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#5
Yes, there is a certain amount of pressure to get your round done and they are always trying to pile on more work.

It can be stressful looking after that amount of cash and mistakes are made regularly by the people around you.

Too hot with all the gear on working against the clock, lugging the boxes/bags in the summer and getting soaked in the winter.

You are constantly eyed up by scroats especially around the shit parts of London thinking they might have a go.

And on top of all that you might get held up at gunpoint like I did, ha ha, wouldn't go back to it again...
 

deltasierra70

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#9
For the record, nobody can legally carry firearms in the UK except the Police.
There are exceptions. I knew of two diamond 'merchants' in the East End of London that carried snub nose .38's both issued by I think, C10. Easier in NI.
Going back to work now...
 

premier

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#10
There are exceptions. I knew of two diamond 'merchants' in the East End of London that carried snub nose .38's both issued by I think, C10. Easier in NI.
Going back to work now...
DS,

You are referring to the good old days when hand guns were still legal...

Regards

premier
 

Oasis

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#11
There are exceptions. I knew of two diamond 'merchants' in the East End of London that carried snub nose .38's both issued by I think, C10. Easier in NI.
Going back to work now...
Sorry DS but what decade are you talking about for these diamond merchants? Certainly not in the last 20 years. And who are C10?
 

deltasierra70

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#12
Sorry DS but what decade are you talking about for these diamond merchants? Certainly not in the last 20 years. And who are C10?
Been in "LaLa Land" too long, hoping to return home soon. Just been discussing that with my wife, and how things are different over there now, and how I have lost touch with the 'new reality' of being in the UK. You'll be asking who C11 is next. Or maybe who were C11? '10' were a Firearm section and 11 were/are technical Surveillance. Need to phone some people over there, if there's any of them still around. If I have the numbers wrong, it'll be because I've been away too long. Came over in late 1989 as Airborne Sentinel Ltd and formed Airborne Sentinel Inc and several others. Been here ever since.
Need to go home... :(
 

Oasis

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#13
DS
That I can understand, all the department designations have changed backwards and forwards over the last 30 years, 'A' Squad MPSB is now SO1. Royalty Protection is SO14 and SO13 and 12 amalgamated to form SO15. SO19 are Firearms but have been through CO19 and back, but one thing is for sure Only Police are Authorised to carry firearms on mainland UK and very occasionally some CRW units from SF when engaged on a MACP (military aid to the civil power). I stand to be corrected on that but until fairly recently I was a National Police Firearms Tac Advisor and am still very much in touch, so I have a little knowledge of the subject, for sure if you hear of any 'civilians' (East End jewellers or otherwise) possessing a handgun in mainland Britain, it will be illegal.
 

deltasierra70

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#14
DS
That I can understand, all the department designations have changed backwards and forwards over the last 30 years, 'A' Squad MPSB is now SO1. Royalty Protection is SO14 and SO13 and 12 amalgamated to form SO15. SO19 are Firearms but have been through CO19 and back, but one thing is for sure Only Police are Authorised to carry firearms on mainland UK and very occasionally some CRW units from SF when engaged on a MACP (military aid to the civil power). I stand to be corrected on that but until fairly recently I was a National Police Firearms Tac Advisor and am still very much in touch, so I have a little knowledge of the subject, for sure if you hear of any 'civilians' (East End jewellers or otherwise) possessing a handgun in mainland Britain, it will be illegal.
Thanks for the update. Been here since 1989 with last trip back 5 years ago (I think) and 'My' experience has always been that there's exceptions to every rule in life, in every place I have been in my life.
 

Oasis

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#15
Thanks for the update. Been here since 1989 with last trip back 5 years ago (I think) and 'My' experience has always been that there's exceptions to every rule in life, in every place I have been in my life.
Not in this case, there are no exceptions to who can carry any kind of weapon for self defence. It is strictly illegal. That said, the only other people who can carry firearms are POTUS Team when he is visiting or the Israelis when their president is visiting, end of.
 

deltasierra70

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#16
Just had an email reply to a question of mine from the 'front line' negotiator for firearms owners in the UK QUOTE:

David,
Antiques aside (and ‘antique’ is not just muzzle loaders and obsolete ignition systems such as pin-fire, but includes large rim-fires and a few chambered for early centre-fire cartridges such as .44 Russian) you can possess a pistol in Britain for the following purposes: Slaughter of animals; humane killing of animals (i.e. vermin controllers or deer stalkers, usually restricted to two shot capacity), 9mm and .410 shot pistols for shooting vermin and historic handguns. The latter is complex and different from ‘antiques’. Those not chambered for a readily available cartridge such as .38 Special and made before 1919 can be held at home as part of a collection (and the applicant has to satisfy the police that he is a collector), but without ammunition. Those made after 1918 or chambered for a readily available cartridge can be owned and even shot non-competitively, but must be kept at a Home Office designated site, such as Bisley.
Firearms law is currently being reviewed by the Law Commission with a view to ‘codification’, which means a complete re-write with the possibility of some beneficial changes, but this would take perhaps the next four years.

There is also a move on behalf of the EU to revisit the Firearms Directive and I am awaiting news of a meeting on the subject held today in Brussels.

Kind Regards,
*****
That's that for now.
DS
 

Azarias

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#17
Home office guidelines are quite clear.

Firearms for personal protection 13.80 Applications for the grant of a firearm certificate for the applicant’s, or another’s, protection, or that of premises, should be refused on the grounds that firearms are not an acceptable means of protection in Great Britain. It has been the view of successive Governments for many years that the private possession and carriage of firearms for personal protection is likely to lead to an increase in levels of violence. This principle should be maintained in the case of applications from representatives of banks and firms protecting valuables or large quantities of money, or from private security guards and bodyguards. The exception to this would be armed guards on UK flagged ships, the justification being the unique threat posed by piracy to cargo and passenger ships in specific high risk geographical areas. MembersoftheArmedForcesandPoliceAuthorisedFirearmsOfficers 13.82 A person in the Armed Forces who wishes to purchase, acquire or have in their possession any firearm for their own private use (that is, as a private citizen rather than in the course of their military duties) must apply to the local chief officer of police for a certificate, and have their application considered in the normal way (including payment of the appropriate fee). “Military trainingâ€, “TA training†and “membership of the Army Rifle Association†are not considered to meet the “good reason†requirement. Possible reasons for the grant of a certificate include: membership of a recognised civilian or military target shooting club, sporting purposes, or shooting vermin. Similar provisions apply to applications from police Authorised Firearms Officers who wish to shoot in a private capacity. 13.83 The Ministry of Defence would appreciate a report being sent to the Commanding Officer of any member of the armed forces who requests a Firearm Certificate quoting “Military Training†or “TA Training†as “good reason†to possess a privately owned firearm.

Regards
 

Flying

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#18
Yes, there is a certain amount of pressure to get your round done and they are always trying to pile on more work.
It can be stressful looking after that amount of cash and mistakes are made regularly by the people around you.
Too hot with all the gear on working against the clock, lugging the boxes/bags in the summer and getting soaked in the winter.
You are constantly eyed up by scroats especially around the shit parts of London thinking they might have a go.
And on top of all that you might get held up at gunpoint like I did, ha ha, wouldn't go back to it again...
This is pretty much how things were with G4S in Canada as well. If you get really good and are able to finish your rounds early, the next week the managers would just add another stop to your route, rewarding the teams who are slow and punishing the ones that were fast.
Recently in Canada there has been a string of Cash in Transit robberies where the criminals used pepper spray to temporarily incapacitate the Cash Custodians. It's worked twice so far so I would be on the watch for copy cats, more so in the UK since firearms are harder to come by.

Overall though I would recommend the job on the basis of using it as a stepping stone. That is the main reason why those companies are always hiring. Everyone is using it as a way to 'prove' themselves before applying to higher responsibility, higher paying jobs.
 
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