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Police Close Protection v Military Close Protection

morriente

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#1
Just thought id start this thread to see what everybody thought........ How does Police Close Protection compare with Military Close Protection?
 

mally1

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#2
Hi

I worked with a diplomatic protection team in Afghanistan for a visit there.

They had MP5 single shot trigger mechanism's so we gave them the choice of using our trigger mech's with 3 round burst and auto.

We also had granades and smoke, they didn't.

But as a team we worked well and got on excellent. Met some good chaps.

Not sure about course difference
 

co19

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#4
I don't think so......The RMP course from my understanding from people who have done the course, aims at the snr nco for the planning phase where jnr ranks do not put that much input in there, but it is still an excellent course. I have had 1 x ex longmoor course on a full cp course this year and 4 on a refresher.

To become a police cp officer you will have to have completed 9 weeks of driver training-Standard/Advanced/Anti-Hijack, 2 weeks of first aid training, 7 weeks of tactics and practical courses-Basic/CP+Hostile Environment Week plus refresher and further training throughout the year.

Plus to have got to this position you may have had to do several years on a surveillance team or on an SO19/CO19 team.

And after the President of the USA and US politicians who do you reckon the next highest threat is against,
The United Kingdoms PM and its senior politicians.
 
Last edited:

morriente

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#5
Interesting so far guys.....Also forgot to mention that Police CPO's / Security Escort drivers carry out there role providing Royalty and Diplomatic Protection for the same wages as a Bobby on the Beat.....
 

mally1

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#6
Interesting so far guys.....Also forgot to mention that Police CPO's / Security Escort drivers carry out there role providing Royalty and Diplomatic Protection for the same wages as a Bobby on the Beat.....
Bet they get a suit allowance of a couple of pence aday.
Good on them, I wonder if they are tempted to work in the cp industry for bettre wages..
 

morriente

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#7
Sorry to burst your bubble mally, but they took the suit allowance away as well as pretty much everything else we used to get........It's a poor state of affairs nowadays......
 

ss20

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#8
Come on fellas!! you make life in the old bill sound really bad!!
You must be looking forward to your 2% pay rise!! over the next year??
What a scandel!! looks like you are going to have to stick together on this and vote for the right to strike!! as i know many people who will be reading this will never do that, it will send a warning to the government that essential workers are just that, essential!! and not a pawn to be moved for polictical standing!!
Fist in the air, in the land of Hipocrisy!!
 

co19

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#9
The Met Prot teams still get allowances for suits and dinner jackets, I think its 2 per year. As to wages..... most officers are over the 15 year mark so are on close to £38.000 per year with allowances. Add to that a £5000 bonus payment for the role they do add to that the overtime of several thousand and you are looking at £50.000 per year average. When I left I wasn't far off that and that was 3 years ago.
 

taylor104

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#10
I have worked with the Met guys, both in Iraq and Afghanistan on numerous occasions , and have met some good guys. One of them even got my photo of me an 'tone' signed and sent back out to me.
They do take the mick out of their inspectors tho' as they are on a salary whereas the boys are on overtime and all the other bits that salaried officers dont get.
They would always call us beforehand to let us know they were coming(not who with obviously) and ask if they could bring anything out for us.
And obviously we never kicked the arse out of it!!
AJ
 

co19

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#11
some of the teams average around 9 hostile environment visits a year these days, its a big money earner for them. Another mate of mine recently went around the far east travelling to Japan and Nepal to name a few so there is good travel.
 
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#12
Hello all,

My first posting on the site and wanted to add my bit about military vs. police CP work. I’ve done both and think that each genre has its place. The military style tends to be best suited to working in overt teams and aimed at providing a safe and secure environment for others to work within a belligerent space. The police style is ensuring a high profile person can safely travel and work within a semi-permissive environment. Protocol, liaison and pre-emptive planning tend to occupy the police CPO’s time.

One is preventative planning and the other is aggressive mitigation. Each has their place but I believe the police style is best suited to the UK market.

Kind regards

Frank
 

apple27

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#13
I have found that the difference between the two to be down to the more aggressive role of the military guys. Looking after a Brigadier in places like Helmund is always going to be a lot more dangerous than a high ranking politician in London. The police have to justify every single round fired, whereas guys in the Mil may not have to (hence the use of belt fed weapons, 40mm HE etc), despite what the ROE may state, obviously common sense and moral standing will always dictate your actions. I worked with a couple of tone's guys in kabul, a few years ago and they were good guys. One was frustrated at their units reluctance to get some serious weapons (5.56mm +) for them despite some of the locations they were now required to operate in since 9/11. They told me that assault rifles were seen as too aggressive for their role. I can understand that in the UK, but when you are in Iraq/A'Stan, then a semi auto only MP5 is about as much use as a chocolate fireguard.
I'm sure there will be more opinions on this subject from both camps, but the military have it in my book as it is easier to tone things down, but hard to turn it up if you haven't had that training in the first place.
 

apple27

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#14
Further to my comments, I would agree with Frank that the Police background would be best suited to UK style work. The current scene in Kabul/Iraq would be best suited to Military guys.
 
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#15
Let me just through a couple of points in for discussion. Although we carry out similiar roles they are not the same. Royalty or Diplomatic CP is normally carried out within a ring of steel whether in London or Iraq. If an incident should occur the BG will get the boss into some kind of cover and await the masses to take on the threat (and why not? That sounds like sence to me) The Military BG usually has far fewer allies to rely on and will travel around in far fewer vehicles. That is why we are trained to extract many hundreds of metres on foot and why we have much more firepower, because there usually is no other support. There is also quite a difference between age and fitness. I have witnessed this on refresher courses and on Ops. That aside, I do believe that we shouldn't take them as young as we do and not much can replace experience. There is a place for the blue rinse brigade close to my heart and I have made many friends as a result of working alongside them. Long may it last.
 

Hippo

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#16
Apple 27

Whilst in Basra I had a large number of Met Pol Prot teams and a Met Pol RPG visit my location with various Principles. What struck me was although they were alloacted on teams whilst in UK if ther principle was to leave country they could decide not to go with them. There were a few guys who constantly came out as volunteers from other temas to fill the slots and make the money as well and why not. But to be able to choose if you go overseas to a hostile country or not with your principle that you work with day in day out in Uk or other less volatile countries i think is wrong. You either want to protect that principle and call yourself a PPO (Civ Pol CP) or you don't it not a pic n mix job.
 

co19

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#17
Alot of it is team dynamics, people not wanting to spend to much time with other people. Plus they do some serious hours and some famillies are not happy with there other halves being away so much. I am out with them (SO1) this thursday as there is a social occasion on.
 
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#18
Let me just through a couple of points in for discussion. Although we carry out similiar roles they are not the same. Royalty or Diplomatic CP is normally carried out within a ring of steel whether in London or Iraq. If an incident should occur the BG will get the boss into some kind of cover and await the masses to take on the threat (and why not? That sounds like sence to me) The Military BG usually has far fewer allies to rely on and will travel around in far fewer vehicles. That is why we are trained to extract many hundreds of metres on foot and why we have much more firepower, because there usually is no other support. There is also quite a difference between age and fitness. I have witnessed this on refresher courses and on Ops. That aside, I do believe that we shouldn't take them as young as we do and not much can replace experience. There is a place for the blue rinse brigade close to my heart and I have made many friends as a result of working alongside them. Long may it last.
 

saps-za

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#20
I cant talk for the guys from the UK, but i have worked with guys from the military and guys from the police cp teams from diffrent countries and find it better to work with the police, the military guys dont know how to talk to and interact with the VIP.

On the other hand i have worked with some diplomatic police from some EU countries that have never worked in a "threat" enviroment as where they work with their VIP its very safe, so in that case i would rather work military CP if need to say to Iraq as would not trust some of these guys in the Diplomatic team.
 
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