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Quikclot Provided for European Military

Madera

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#1
I saw this posting on line and thought it might be of interest to this site. I have personal experience with the use of Quikclot gauze and believe it belongs in every first aid kit. It has saved numerous lives in combat situations and is now being used by police, emergency medical units and hospitals.

[h3]Z-Medica Supplies QuikClot Gauze to Five European Country Armed Forces[/h3]
18/11/2010Z-Medica Corporation (QuikClot)

QuikClot Gauze to be used by Armed Forces of Denmark, France, Italy, Poland and Sweden

Z-Medica Corporation, a medical device company developing innovative hemostatic agents, today announced that it has recently agreed to supply agreements with five European governments to provide QuikClot® Gauze™ to their militaries. Following a competitive proposal, comprehensive review and testing process, the Armed Forces of the Polish Republic, the Danish Defence, the French Armed Forces, the Italian Armed Forces and the Swedish Armed Forces all chose QuikClot Gauze as their exclusive first line of hemostatic treatment for soldiers.

Z-Medica has a history of providing life-saving products to the U.S. Military. In 2008 QuikClot® Combat Gauze™ was chosen by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) as the United States Military’s sole source supplier for first-line hemostatic treatment for traumatic bleeding, based on tests conducted by the U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research and the Naval Medical Research Center. It is carried by all soldiers currently serving in all branches of the U.S. military and has been credited with saving the lives of those who have suffered traumatic wounds. In 2009, QuikClot® Combat Gauze™ was named as one of the “Top Ten Greatest Inventions of 2008†by the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

“Serving the armed forces of U.S. allies is a top goal of Z-Medica’s since we became the exclusive provider to the U.S. military, and we are pleased to have now gained the approval to serve these allied nations,†said Brian Herrman, Chief Executive Officer, Z-Medica. “We will continue to seek further adoption by other U.S. allied nations as we aim to provide the life-saving abilities of QuikClot Combat Gauze to all of the men and women that fight for the freedoms our countries enjoy.â€

QuikClot Combat Gauze is a soft, white, sterile, nonwoven 3†by 12 feet rolled or z-folded gauze impregnated with kaolin, an inert mineral with no known contraindications. Each roll of QuikClot Combat Gauze is individually wrapped in an easy rip, military grade pouch. Indicated for temporary external control of traumatic bleeding, QuikClot Combat Gauze is flexible and pliable and contours to all wounds, and can achieve hemostasis in severe bleeding situations in as little as three minutes.

QuikClot products received CE Mark from the European Union in November 2009 and the company has been negotiating distribution agreements with allied nations’ armed forces since that time. The CE Marked products are indicated as an adjunct to manual pressure for temporary control of moderate external bleeding from surgical wounds or cuts and lacerations. Z-Medica also recently entered agreements for the distribution of the QuikClot line of related healthcare products within hospitals of European countries including Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland.

About Z-Medica
Z-Medica Corporation is a medical device company developing innovative hemostatic agents. The company manufactures and markets its QuikClot® family of products for hemostasis for use by healthcare professionals, first responders, law enforcement officers and the military. QuikClot products rapidly enhance the body’s natural coagulation process, helping to achieve hemostasis faster. Z-Medica’s QuikClot® Combat Gauze™ product was chosen by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) as the United States Military’s sole source supplier for first-line hemostatic treatment, based on tests conducted by the Naval Medical Research Center and the U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research. It continues to be the exclusive product used by all USA military forces for first line treatment of bleeding hemorrhage. QuikClot® products are also widely used by first responders, in hospital emergency rooms, interventional cardiology and radiology laboratories and other healthcare environments where bleeding requires fast and effective control. Z-Medica is a privately-held company based in Wallingford, CT. More information about Z-Medica Corporation is available at ZMedica - QuikClot adsorbent hemostatic agent for healthcare providers speeds coagulation & rapidly stops blood loss: Z-Medica Corporation.
 

sr.medic

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#2
We supply the other brand in our med kits.....Celox Granules and Celox Gauze roll...both excellent next gen hemostatic agents, exactly the same as quikclot.
 
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#3
I had gone through the post. The details posted are very interesting and also exclusive for that are to be aware of these by many of us.That was really a tough job to go that long away from the people for the sake of the job. Sometimes due to a lengthy distance the things can be happened out of his coverage. Please produce some of the updates included in these.

*Links removed, to advertise please see the information marked "Advertise" thanks* - CL

http://www.closeprotectionworld.com/misc.php?do=page&template=advertise
 
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Phecta

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#4
Please note that whilst Quick Clot, Celox gauze and other products have their place in trauma care, the industry standard when testing the effectiveness of these products is to allow the subject to "Bleed Out" for 3 minutes.

After bleeding for 3 minutes, then blood pressure is greatly reduced and the subject's haemorrhage is arrested more easily than would be achieved if the product were applied immediately.

As I stated these products have their place but they do not stop the bleeding. Its your hands and pressure that stop the bleeding and if you fail to apply direct pressure then the subject will continue to loose circulatory body fluids and blood pressure will drop to dangerous non perfusing levels.
 

Carl Dowd

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#7
Please note that whilst Quick Clot, Celox gauze and other products have their place in trauma care, the industry standard when testing the effectiveness of these products is to allow the subject to "Bleed Out" for 3 minutes.

After bleeding for 3 minutes, then blood pressure is greatly reduced and the subject's haemorrhage is arrested more easily than would be achieved if the product were applied immediately.

As I stated these products have their place but they do not stop the bleeding. Its your hands and pressure that stop the bleeding and if you fail to apply direct pressure then the subject will continue to loose circulatory body fluids and blood pressure will drop to dangerous non perfusing levels.
That's interestring Phecta... good information mate... I have been advance FA qualified (Mountaineering) most of my professional life and I have never heard of that before... Tell me please mate... would that 3 minutes be dependent or subject to 'Blood Loss'..? or the type of wound? or someone on 'Thinners'..? Is this is a judgement issue mate..?

CD
 

Customloads

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#8
I am sure all he meant was that these products are given 3 minutes to work under test conditions, it is no good relying on them alone. They are an aid to good patient management, nothing more.
 

Merit Training

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#9
the industry standard when testing the effectiveness of these products is to allow the subject to "Bleed Out" for 3 minutes.

After bleeding for 3 minutes, then blood pressure is greatly reduced and the subject's haemorrhage is arrested more easily than would be achieved if the product were applied immediately.
Good point mate, but I have used both the Quickclot Gauze and the Celox gauze in anger without letting the casualty "bleed out for three minutes." Both products did well and helped to produce a clot.

These products do not stop bleeding. Direct pressure IN the wound stops the bleeding. The haemostatics only help create a bigger clot.

It irks me to see women in super short skirts pushing this product during medical conferences saying that the product stops bleeding. They obviously have never used it in anger. It means that untrained people will buy this product, shove it into a wound and wonder why their casualty dies due to lack of direct pressure.
 

Merit Training

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#10
I am sure all he meant was that these products are given 3 minutes to work under test conditions, it is no good relying on them alone. They are an aid to good patient management, nothing more.
One more thing that I forgot to mention: 3 minutes is not long enough for these products to work. Especially in a cold environment.

Here at Merit Training we teach that you need to push for 5 minutes with half of your body weight. That is the correct amount of direct pressure.

The package says 3 minutes because they are trying to sell you something. Your body cannot possibly clot in that short amount of time.

This is the difference between real world training and only doing what the manufacturer says.
 

Carl Dowd

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#11
Guys you are confusing me here... perhaps I'm a little slow on the uptake... 'Define' Bleedout please, are we talking here that you do nothing for 3 minutes post ABC when you arrive on scene or are we talking that you at least apply whatever it is you are going to use, but DO NOT apply pressure for at least 3 minutes... (Which brings me back to my original questions to Phecta) You experts need to remember that we, mere mortals, do not deal with these issues everyday of the week!

I look forward to your clarification...

Many thanks

CD
 

littlewoman

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#12
Guys you are confusing me here... perhaps I'm a little slow on the uptake... 'Define' Bleedout please, are we talking here that you do nothing for 3 minutes post ABC when you arrive on scene or are we talking that you at least apply whatever it is you are going to use, but DO NOT apply pressure for at least 3 minutes... (Which brings me back to my original questions to Phecta) You experts need to remember that we, mere mortals, do not deal with these issues everyday of the week!

I look forward to your clarification...

Many thanks

CD
I think there are two lots of 3 minutes being talked about.
In test conditions they allow the subject to bleed for 3 minutes to "simulate a response time" or to make it easier for the product to work (so it looks better in demonstrations) as there will be less blood pressure. It then takes 3 minutes to work.

Non-one is suggesting that in real life you wait any time before applying it.

Just to clarify how this stuff works and clotting in general. When in injury occurs the body triggers the forming of a chemical in the blood that starts the clotting process. The chemical creates another chemical which in turn creates the first chemical, these two continue to create each other gradually making the blood thicker until there is enough to make it clot. But if there is fresh blood coming to the area, that blood won't have these chemicals so dilutes the thicker blood. Obviously the blood with the chemicals will generate the same chemicals in the new blood, but the blood needs to be producing chemicals faster than the new blood is diluting them.
That is where pressure comes in. By reducing the new blood getting to the scene, the chemicals should multiply fast enough to form a clot.
Quick clot just increases the speed of the chemical generation. Obviously you still need to apply pressure.
 

Merit Training

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#13
Guys you are confusing me here...
Hey mate, sorry for the confusion.

Direct pressure in the wound should be applied immediately. Nothing is more important than that.

If you don't have any haemostatics or a tourniquet keep holding the direct pressure until help arrives.

Do you remember the movie Black Hawk Down? That medic kept Cpl. Smith alive for 18 hours with only direct pressure. He didn't have a good tourniquet or anything else.

Direct pressure in the wound first. Then apply haemostatic dressing making sure to continue to apply direct pressure as you are stuffing the wound with Celox gauze. Once the wound cavity is filled with Celox then continue to hold direct pressure on the pile of gauze that is stuffed into the wound FOR FIVE MINUTES.

That will stop 95% of your junctional catastrophic hemorrhages.
 

Customloads

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#14
CD - Forget all about the 3 minutes. It is just a number used by the manufacturers, it is not an indicator nor relates to real world treatment.

As Abbas O'Kiefy said, just push on the wound. Strap it if you can, and or stuff it. Jobs a goodun. :)
 

Carl Dowd

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#15
Hey mate, sorry for the confusion.

Direct pressure in the wound should be applied immediately. Nothing is more important than that.

If you don't have any haemostatics or a tourniquet keep holding the direct pressure until help arrives.

Do you remember the movie Black Hawk Down? That medic kept Cpl. Smith alive for 18 hours with only direct pressure. He didn't have a good tourniquet or anything else.

Direct pressure in the wound first. Then apply haemostatic dressing making sure to continue to apply direct pressure as you are stuffing the wound with Celox gauze. Once the wound cavity is filled with Celox then continue to hold direct pressure on the pile of gauze that is stuffed into the wound FOR FIVE MINUTES.

That will stop 95% of your junctional catastrophic hemorrhages.
OK thx mucca, appreciate it... I have done my fair share of saving life in them there hills but I am always keen and willing to see things differently and learn form the medic pros who as far as I am concerned do an absolutely exceptional job in the field... If it were down to me..? you would all have pay rises, MBE's, bigger pensions than trough mongering politicians and life membership to SW1X 0EZ...

CD
 

Gregv

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#16
Ya I would tourniquet the crap out of any injury if it's on an extremity, only then apply gauze and any clotting agent. Doing it the other way around would result in more blood loss and a difficult work area.

If they're not screaming from the tourniquet, it's not tight enough! A limb can survive for up to 6 hours with little to no blood flow.

I have no experience with chest wounds, so I'm not sure what the best compromise is of pressure vs treating it. I'd probably stuff the hell out of it with sterile gauze or cotton first, then go with pressure. I would imagine the gauze would increase the effectiveness of the pressure by filling any cavities, allow the blood to stay fixed so it coagulates better, and generally keep the wound from getting slick as snot and making it a pain to work with.

Am I way off here?
 
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