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The public, camera phones and your workplace!

irishdoorsupervisor

Longterm Registered User
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
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#1
Can a member of the public video you within your workplace ie working as a DS. I am aware that bars/clubs although privately owned are classed as public places as the public are invited in etc.

how may times would you ask someone to stop before you act?
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2014
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#2
Can a member of the public video you within your workplace ie working as a DS. I am aware that bars/clubs although privately owned are classed as public places as the public are invited in etc.

how may times would you ask someone to stop before you act?
Anyone can legally film in public, however on private premises not filming can be a condition imposed on visitors. A place can be classed as a public place and not be public land
 

Sjda90

New Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2017
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#3
Can a member of the public video you within your workplace ie working as a DS. I am aware that bars/clubs although privately owned are classed as public places as the public are invited in etc.

how may times would you ask someone to stop before you act?
So I work in a club and here is my understanding of video recording.

If your place of work allows people to record inside then there isn’t very much you can do as it’s allowed.

If your place of work does not allow it then they are simply not allowed too. It’s private property, yes I understand the club maybe open to the public however, it should be in your door policy/admission policy.

If a person is simply on the street (public land) recording you at the front door then there isn’t anything you can do about it.



The club I work at doesn’t allow any camera use inside the venue without prior permissions from the manager. They also have it as part of there admissions policy/door policy and clear signage at the enterance of the club.
 

sekura

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Sep 7, 2017
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#4
^What sprog said.

Photography is perfectly legal (and can be argued to even be a legal right) in any public place including most galleries and museums, unless of course they revoke such a right. Excluding certain commercial restrictions such as at Royal Parks and the London Squares and the recent anti-terrorism laws, we probably have the most liberal such laws in the world. You can photograph anything you like even if illegal in other circumstances including nudity, assuming it wasn't harassing to do so.

If the person is outside the premises, assuming in a public area then unless they are harassing you by doing such, there is little you can really do. Like anything it's best to try and reason with them in a calm and respectable manner if you feel threatened and try and resolve the situation.

If it's indoors then the rules are set by the venue. Do note that you're not allowed to confiscate the equipment including the memory cards or force them to delete the content. Whilst they may have broken venue policy and/or taken pictures, this is a civil matter not a criminal one. The venue can sue the individual. Taking equipment is theft and could be considered criminal.
 

chrisviking87

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Mar 23, 2018
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#5
Technically its legal, but I would warn them that I don't want to be videoed, and that I don't give them the permission to do so. If they carried on I would remove the camera itself and either talk to them and make them leave.

You're all saying "theres not much you can do" and "its perfectly legal" but is it? Why should someone have a video of me without me wanting them to? Would it be the same if some weirdo was following a woman around and videoing them, no its harassment and they would be warned and removed. Lets be real, I'm not going to let people video a colleague restraining someone. You need to use your own judgement of the situation, but somebody videoing you, is attempting to provoke you into something which also isn't acceptable
 

colonel45155

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May 4, 2010
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#6
To answer your question, yes, anyone can pull out a camera phone, it's all over Youtube Police officers and security ops being recorded, TV license guys getting met at the front door with a camera, (I actually find that amusing) - sure we have those god awful bodycams that we all hate. welcome to big brother land.

Even if it 'was' illegal and the law required someone to delete the footage its shared a million times through social media so it's never really gone. Best just keeping yourself professional at all times.
 
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