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Watches

AdamGent

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Jun 21, 2010
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#1
Hi Guys,

I have written this article "The Ideal 'Adventurers' Watch" as a bit of a buyers guide to choosing a good watch for working in remote or industrial environments.

Now I am a self-confessed "Kit Whore" but after loosing and damaging enough nice watches I have started to rethink what is appropriate!

I'm not going to tell you what I reckon 'the ideal' watch is (you'll have to read it :p) but as some of you will work in genuinely hostile environments I was wondering what you guys thought of what I have written. Do you agree? Disagree? Don't hold back. If I am going to put something out there I would rather is was based as much on experience as theory.

Thanks in advance.
 

shaka

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Mar 22, 2010
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#2
Thanks for putting me onto a good resource, practical and "makes sense", cheers C
 

DanD

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Oct 24, 2007
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#3
Hmmm...can see what you are doing here, but to be honest, not actually a lot of info, and the bit about having the special edition of the winged dagger to impress your friends, is well..........lets not go there!!
 

stevepmag

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Jul 9, 2010
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#4
One factor for hostile environments is how much attention your watch is going to draw to you. At a checkpoint a flash watch may be seen as an indication you've got other goodies worth liberating from you.

Dual time zones so you can track time where you are and whether your HQ is awake is useful and some that have an analogue and smaller digital display for a second time zone can give you both at once.

A watch with an alarm I used to find key, especially if you needed to get your head down for a couple of hours when in transit and didn't want to miss your connecting flight, less relevant now with most mobile phones having an alarm function but still useful.

Synthetic watch straps have a lot of plus points but a lot of them don't mix well with mossie repellant.

In terms of cost and price range, it's a bit like how much money you can afford to bet on horses IMHO, only pay what you can afford to lose, as sooner or later it will either be trashed or taken from you.

On some flights (and Argos) you used to be able to get a vesrion of the Timex Adventurer that had an analogue face, digital display for a second time zone, alarm, stopwatch, cloth strap, a bezel you could use for navigation and it used to be about £30. Change it every couple of years when the battery goes flat.
 

AdamGent

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Jun 21, 2010
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#5
Thanks Stevepmag, lots of good points:

One factor for hostile environments is how much attention your watch is going to draw to you. At a checkpoint a flash watch may be seen as an indication you've got other goodies worth liberating from you...

Dual time zones so you can track time where you are and whether your HQ is awake is useful and some that have an analogue and smaller digital display for a second time zone can give you both at once....

Synthetic watch straps have a lot of plus points but a lot of them don't mix well with mossie repellant...

In terms of cost and price range...only pay what you can afford to lose...
I haven't included dual-times here as most of my audience are UK based but I might weave it in as an option. The other points I might also try and weave in as they are universally valid.

Hmmm...can see what you are doing here, but to be honest, not actually a lot of info, and the bit about having the special edition of the winged dagger to impress your friends, is well..........lets not go there!!
Sorry DanD, Perhaps I should have mentioned, I don't work in CP or Hostile environments, I wrote this largely for a Civvy audience, but as you say, you see what I am trying to do; it's very often those who do not need a top watch who wear one and there is a big macho ego thing about them. As for the 'Winged Dagger' (I have just been corrected and told is is a Flaming Sword :eek:) well, this just labours my point; it doesn't make it a better watch but you just know that someone is going to be swayed by it...:rolleyes: Certainly no offence is intended to anyone.

But thanks for taking the time to click through, read it and comment. Appreciated.
 
Last edited:

james 1

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Dec 30, 2007
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#8
Hello

It looks like you have tailored the watch to your own needs. may be you should right reviews on different types of watches for different jobs the best for price best for water etc
 

AdamGent

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Jun 21, 2010
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#9
Good point James 1. It wasn't exactly tailored to my specific needs, rather I was going for a generic watch, but with the emphasis on function rather than form. But you're right...the problem of being too generic is the outcome won't suit anyone! I will think on...

DanD: I've removed the offending statement - it was meant to be tongue in cheek, but as you say it doesn't add anything to the article, if anything it detracted from it.

stevepmag: I've included some of the points you raised. Thanks for that.

Dance_with_the_devil: I have always liked the G10, one of the most indistict watches I know but it's the simplicity I like. Going back to james 1's point; I think I have tried to be a bit bold, stick my head above the parapet and in doing so have been too limited.

You all get the gist of it, it is about choosing kit that is fit for purpose rather than the temptation to part with your 'hard earned' for the sake of brand or image. And this relates to so much kit we use. Thanks for all you input.

I'm a big fan of credit where credit is due, when other people help me out with this sort of stuff I'll usually credit them or link back to the forum. Was just wondering if a statement at the bottom something along the lines of "written with contributions from www.closeprotection..." out of courtesy, or would you rather not drive non-CP users to this site? As I said, I don't work in CP but I frequent the participate in the Medical forums here because there is a lot of good quality stuff here (more than most 'first aid' forums I would frequent) and it translates to my remit of remote medicine. But I understand if you want to keep the users CP-specific.
 

DocKibbey

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Jun 9, 2011
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#10
I instruct Adv tactical pistol courses and am prior military along with many other areas of instruction and experience. Their are pros and cons to all watches and I approach them just like approaching someone who is new to pistols or any other firearms. I tell them to start with what they are familiar and comfortable with and go with the K.I.S.S principle (Keep it Simple Stupid). With a firearm don't pick one with all the bells and whistles in safeties because they will just complicate things and piss you off. Go by your enviroment, P.O.U (Philosophy of Use), comfort, and functions. While just like with firearms and any other bit of kit out there you're mileage may vary with gear choices. One thing to keep in mind when it comes to survival is to use a watch with hands as it can help you in a survival situations (ie: helps you find your cardinal directions, lest you were a dumbass and forgot a compass). Also pick a watch that in a survival worst case scenario you could sacrifice as you can use the watch crystal with sun to start a fire. Although you should have plenty of options in your kit for the forementioned situations before you use your watch. I agree with alarm functions, dual times and of course pick one that is water proof, not just some high $$$$ piece that is water resistant. If you fail to plan then you plan to fail! I personally use the Suunto Core that also gives me an altimeter, barometer, and compass. Though I usually have at least 2 backup compasses with me. For me it has served very well and faithfully and being a Divemaster/Rescue Diver I have had a Suunto Dive Computer for the last 10yrs that is still going strong with hundreds of dives on it. You don't want to pick gear that is bargain priced and you learn why at a later date, while you want to pick affordable gear lest you stand out to much and mind your pocket book; you don't want to pick up bargain watches at your local flea market or thrift store because you like with all your gear should always focus primarily on survival.
 

Ivan67

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Nov 1, 2008
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#11
I have kept a pocket watch since I got my first time piece. I have many kinds for all occasions. To me a wrist watch is nothing more than an advertisement. But I am fond of some time pieces and there craftsmanship, I just would not own one.
 
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