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just a quick one regarding the TIER system set up 9 explanation )

Med1c999

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#23
Ed,

The tier system for Iraq is an oil and gas designation as set out in OGP Report 343, Shell has its own interpretation that starts at tier 0, tier 1 being FPOS-I and tier 2 being Offshore/Paramedic/Nurse with ACLS and PHTLS. The OGP is Tier 2 is FPOS-I (kind of, requires 40 hours of training including some skills such as IV access, so FPOS-I is not exactly the square peg for the square hole but accepted by most) and Tier 3 is Offshore/Paramedic/Nurse. For those looking to get out to the pit it is best to ask direct what the requirements are before submitting the CV as many get disappointed when the qualifications are asked for. Hope this helps a bit.
 

ed

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#24
cheers buddy abit clearer now

so tier 0 would be FAAW everything below FPOS 1 (basic) i would assume

cheers ed
 

Med1c999

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#25
Tier 0 does not carry a course designation (if it did it would probably be FPOS-Basic), it is the first responder to the incident, it is all based on response timelines, FAAW is not recognised as an acceptable course for tiered medic positions by any of the companies as far as i am aware, . For the pit most companies servicing the IOCs demand either FPOS-I or MIRA as a minimum for tier 2 (Shell tier 1). These designations have caused a wee bit of a stir amongst the medical fraternity as you have experienced as they are causing some dilution of the trade however not all can be tarred with the same brush. Some companies are also very picky with the training providers for some qualifications too.
 

lssah2025

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#26
Us seppo's came up with the system, but it was not for medical, someone decided that tier 1 medic sounded cool!!! The tier system is for special operations teams. (Special Missions, Counter Terrorism, direct action, black ops)
Tier 1 asset: DevGroup (SEAL TEAM 6), 1st SFOD-D (Delta)
Tier 2 asset: 75th Ranger Rgt, SF, MARSOC, CCT's, PJ's.

This has to do with training, mobility and readiness to deploy nothing with med certs.
 
Last edited:

olks

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#27
Everything being said here is relevant... but it's really a shame that noone seems to remember the doc that was written by our member M4Med. The doc explains it all in details.

Wether this tier labelling is good, bad, moral or whatever... it only follows one logic : business.
Another resource on here that I feel is a shame to have not been mentioned is the epic FPOS vs Mira thread.

http://www.closeprotectionworld.com/medical-training/61554-fpos-v-mira.html

May not answer the question directly but I feel it has addressed a lot of the concerns raised in this thread. I think the information contained in here should be considered.
 

Med1c999

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#28
Anyone with questions regarding the tier system for oil and gas should get a copy of OGP Report 343 Managing Health for Field Operations in Oil & Gas Activities, chapter 7 sets out all the criteria for medics at each level (NB it does not stipulate a course specifically but a set of skills). I have attached the link to the website, Shell Oil have their own tier system that adds a tier 0 basically dropping the OGP levels down a peg. The levels in this report do not take away the PSC's interpretation of the quals when recruiting for these posts.

New health publication: Managing health in field operations – OGP - The International Association of Oil & Gas producers

Hope this goes some way to helping people understand the system, it's not rocket science, close but not quite!

C
 

kevinsmith1002000

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#29
Hi mate, I've worked out in Iraq for around 3 years now as a CP tier 2 medic. As it has already been stated, a tier 2 is a registered paramedic, an off shore medic or an advanced nurse with pre hospital life support and advance cardiac care qualifications. Tier 1 is FPOS I, Mira and few other courses which meet a basic medical knowledge. As far as I know the tier system was brought in by the security companies contracted out to the gas and oil industries to meet the demands and requirements of their clients. As for wether a tier 1 or a tier 2 is needed depends on the task, for example if its a task de mining in a hostile environment obviously you want the highest level of expertise you can get so you would require a tier 2 medic. However at the end of the day the decision comes down to what the client will pay for, not only the higher salary for a tier 2 but the substantial cost of the kit a tier 2 needs. Hope that helps bud
 

TMAC

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#30
Ok, so where does that leave an EMT in the greater scheme of things?
Just curious, having spent €2500 and taken four weeks off to do 160 hours training, plus another 40 hours on an ambulance placement. Plus another €100 for exam fees......
 

RobertL

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#31
What do you mean by an EMT TMAC? It's not a protected title so can mean anything from a 2 day course up to a ambulance technician standard clinician. TBH it doesn't leave you in a very good position unless you have a specific job that you had in mind when you did it.

RL
 

operator144

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#32
Ok, so where does that leave an EMT in the greater scheme of things?
Just curious, having spent €2500 and taken four weeks off to do 160 hours training, plus another 40 hours on an ambulance placement. Plus another €100 for exam fees......
It leaves you at the same level asa Tier1 Medic (ie FPOS(I) and MIRA etc). You will have more knowledge and skills though.
 

TMAC

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#33
My main reason for doing the EMT was personal, as opposed to career enhancing, which is pretty lucky really!
As an EMT, which I am guessing is the same as a UK ambulance tech, we learn the following:

- The wellbeing of the Emergency Medical Technician
- PHECC Code of professional conduct and ethics and Medico-legal issues
- Legislation, Information management and the PHECC Clinical Handbook
- Anatomy and Physiology
- Principles of lifting and moving patients
- Basic patient care

Patient Assessment

- Baseline vitals and SAMPLE history
- Patient assessment


Respiratory Emergencies

- Management of airway and breathing
- Respiratory emergencies

Medical Emergencies

- Cardiac First Response: Practioner Level
- Cardiovascular emergencies
- General medical emergencies


Obstetric Emergencies

- Childbirth and neonatal resuscitation


Trauma

- Bleeding, shock and soft tissue injuries
- Musculoskeletal, head and spinal injuries


Paediatric Emergencies

- Infants and Children

Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Operations

- Ambulance Operations
- Gaining Access
- Hazardous material incident
- Major emergency
- Civil disorder
- Radio communications


Professional Development

- Communications


Clinical Procedures

- Pharmacology
- Infection prevention and control
- Intramuscular injection

So it's got good scope and allows one to go on then to do some remote/austere medicine training.
 

RobertL

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#34
Ace, then it's the better end of the EMT spectrum! What about consolidating that and going on to do the Paramedic qualification?

What are you hoping to do work wise?

RL
 

kevinsmith1002000

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#35
In my experience over here in Iraq, the clients (usually big oil companies) have very specific criteria concerning the medical qualifications and level of abilities for the contracted medic on a psd team or rig. An EMT qual will only get you a tier 1 position. At the same time just being a paramedic or off shore medic is still not enough to get onto a psd team as their is usually the requirement of having to have an SIA CP licence and also military service in a hostile environment. Even if the EMT course covered the full range of paramedic skills such as entubation, needle crych, chest decompression, 12 lead ECG interpretation, all the drug therapies such as morphine and thrombalytics such as retaplase, heparin and a million and one other things I doubt the qual would amount to a tier 2 position because the clients require a HPC registration which you can only obtain by doing the full acredited paramedic course or by being a registered nurse or off sure medic. Usually these requirements are put in place by doctors/consultants employed by the oil companies directly. I'm sure there are many good medics out there who could manage a tier 2 role but unfortunately they slip through the net as the rules are so stringent. Hope this helps explain it a bit better.
 

TMAC

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#36
Ace, then it's the better end of the EMT spectrum! What about consolidating that and going on to do the Paramedic qualification?

What are you hoping to do work wise?

RL
I'm working, the emt was really jusr a bolt on and does just fine for corporate CP here which is all i need. Just asked the question to hear the response really!
 
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